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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
now. egypt is the main broker. egypt is also in contact with the united states. also, there is turkey's involvement, qatar's involvement, the head of the hamas political wing is also involved. in temz of creating with israel, egypt is the main broker. we understand it has not been confirmed for us that an israeli envoy is at the table or at least has been and is involved in these talks, but the impression we're getting from the israeli side is that they're obviously involved in the negotiations and each side is looking very closely at what the other is proposing. has each side sent enough of a message that they can say, okay, this is it. we've sent our message. we want this and that, and now is the time to get off the military ramp? we'll see. >> you've covered this. when you take a look at this situation on the ground and you realize the israeli government is calling up 75,000 reservists, massing tens of thousands of troops and tanks near the border at the palestinian territory, what does this say to you in terms of a ground invasion? does it seem inevitable? what do you make of what
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
. appreciate it. [ sirens ] >>> new violence today in egypt. taking a look at this. protesters throwing rocks, police firing tear gas. fight for democracy intensifying there. cairo's tie rear square. grounds for protester. you hear the chanting. demonstrators are not leaving the square until president morsi withdraws the sweeping powers he granted himself last week. ressa sayah joining us live from cairo. it was billed as the opposition's biggest show of force yet. demonstrators converging, various points throughout the city. what do they hope to accomplish? what is the message? >> reporter: the message is they want to either oust president morsi or have him reverse his controversial decrees announced last thursday. this is an incredible site here behind us the tahrir squire, billed as 1 million man demonstration. not sure if there are 1 million people here, but certainly at lot of people. i'll zoom into tahrir square. the crowd is loud, energized, excited. tens of thousands of people here representing different factions in egypt. representing women's rights groups, western-style liberals, se
through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged about. they're describe this as a power grab by mr. morsi. does it seem that most people understand that and does it make a difference at all? >> reporter: no. they reject that position by mr. morsi, and that explains the outrage. dramatic scenes in tahrirr square, including alexandria and port sayid. these are reminiscent of what we saw last year. it was then aimed at then president hosni mubarak. today the fury is aimed at mr. morsy. >> they were throwing rocks and monthly taf cocktails. the security forces shooting tear gases in the air. very similar scenes to last year. a similar slogan as well, fred. last year we
is the role of egypt with its leadership. a relationship that is much closer now to hamas. is that something that the white house should be concerned about? i mean, that really does seem like really a wild card in all of this. >> suzanne, i don't think it's a wild card. you are spot on. they do need to be concerned about it. more importantly, they need to do something about it to insure that israel is able to prosecute what it needs against hamas and that egypt and the muslim brotherhood stay out of any type of direct engagement or support to what is taking place in gaza right now. that would truly inflame and kind of put into greater can i ones what's taking place in the middle east, so israel needs to breathe -- apologies. egypt needs to breathe through their nose and just stay where they are. hamas and israel are going to have to work this out, and they don't need to have other folks meddling other than to try to get them to calm down, you know, settle the situation a little bit. >> to the other story that we're following. obviously, the scandal involving the former cia director general d
. egypt to the south has pulled its ambassador now from israel and in just moments, i'm going to speak live with israel's defense minister ehud barak. so don't move. one. two. three. my credit card rewards are easy to remember. with the bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. [ both ] 2% back on groceries. [ all ] 3% on gas! no hoops to jump through. i earn more cash back on the things i buy most. [ woman in pet store ] it's as easy as... [ all ] one! -two. -[ all ] three! [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards credit card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. medicare open enrollment. time to compare plans and costs. you don't have to make changes. but it never hurts to see if you can find better coverage, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. ♪ open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. get selsun blue for itchy dry scalp. strong itch-fighters target scalp itch
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
management >>> u.s. election is certainly making headlines around the world today from egypt to europe. our reporters are fanned across the globe with reaction. >> i'm ben wedeman in cairo. most egyptians seem to prefer barack obama over mitt romney. many of them saying they thought the republicans are simply too pro israeli. but for most egyptians, there is so much going on in this country after the revolution, what with a faltering economy, and an uncertain political future. >> reporter: i'm fred platkin in berlin, germany. germans are by and large happy with the outcome of the election. barack obama would have gotten 90% of the vote here in this country. >> reporter: i'm reza sayah in pakistan. four years ago many here supported mr. obama. not the case this year. many wanted change. they wanted mr. romney and that's because they still don't like u.s. policy in the region, especially the drone strikes. >> americans have weighed in on several important ballot initiatives. take a look at this. for the first time voters in maine approved a measure giving same sex couples the right to marry.
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)